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Muscat

Governorate of Muscat is capital of the Sultanate situated on the Gulf of Oman at the south part of Al Batinah coast. It is confined between Gulf of Oman and the mountains of AI Hajr Al Sharyi. The Governorate is the most populous area of the Sultanate. The average density exceeds 24 times the average population density in the Sultanate.The Governorate consists of six wilayats: Muscat, Muttrah,Bowshar, A’Seeb, AlAmerat and Quriyat.

Muscat is the headquarters and the administrative apparatus of the state. It is an old city that played an important role as a commercial station since the early ages of Islam. It is also one of the most important trade centers because of its strategic and special location. It is famous for Al Jalali and Al Mirani forts.

In Muscat and its wilayats we can observe this remarkable harmony between the ancient heritage and the modern contemporary features. You can see the old houses and markets, small shops and narrow roads, next to the modern markets, shops and wide streets. This preserves Oman’s historical and cultural identity on one hand and gives it at the same time the spirit of the age and modernization on the other hand.

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The Wilayat of Muscat runs along the Gulf of Oman across a long mountain range which stretches from Bandar Najih adjacent to the Wilayat of Muttrah on the north western side between the villages of Muttrah and Riam. Here the villages and mountains of Muscat extend as far as the village of Al Sifa at the borders of the Wilayat of Quriyat in the south east. Muscat has nine villages attached to it, these being Sidab, Haramel, Al Bustan, Al Jussa, Qantab, Yankat, Yiti, Al Khayran Al Sifa and Sifat Al Sheikh. The city of Muscat is counted one of the older cities in history having been built at the outset of the Arab migrations which preceded and followed the destruction of the Maarib Dam. We can safely say that its history predates the arrival of Islam by several centuries. Muscat is distinguished by the presence of citadels, forts, towers, walls, gates and historical houses. 

The municipality of Al Sifa is home to Al Sifa Fort which overlooks the sea from its coastal position and backs onto a valley.

The walls of the city of Muscat were its first line of defense in the fortification and protection of the

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This is a city of trade and enterprise, with its port and commercial quarter. Muttrah has a population of 154,316 living in eight residential districts: Muttrah City, Greater Muttrah, Al Wattia, Ruwi City, Wadi Addi, Annat, Qurum (east of the Nature Park) and the Port of Al Fahl. It is said that the name Muttrah (a place to throw something down) comes from the presence of an anchorage for ships (i.e "throw down the anchor").Another interpretation of the name is as of a place to "unload or put down goods or merchandise." The Wilayat of Muttrah is counted amongst the most important of the six Wilayats in Muscat Governorate, on account of its ancient historical and cultural standing; for it was Oman's ancient trading port and its suq was the principal source of the many and diverse goods relayed from the port to the other suqs of Oman. It is said that it was once also a fertile spot much cultivated with date palms and other trees, watered by aflaj and sweetwater wells from which the citizens, orchards and visiting ships were supplied.

Muttrah boasts a number of archaeological and tourist landmarks in the shape of forts,

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Situated between the sea and the mountains south west of Muttrah, its population is 149,506 persons spread over its 43 towns and villages. The most noteworthy of these are: Al Khoweir, Sultan Qaboos City, Al Ghubra, Al Adheeba, Ghala, Al Aa'lam (Information City), Al Sarooj, Bowshar Al Qadima (Old Bowshar) Bowshar Bani Umran, Al Ansab Sanab, Al Hamam, Al Awabi and Al Misfah. Its archaeological remains and the ancient narratives suggest a history going back to the second millennium BC. It is also said –and it is likely to be true – that the name Bowshar is derived from the unrest witnessed by this district in the past, causing it to be called Abu Sharr (the Iniquitous One); until, when matters settled it was shortened to Bowshar.

The Beit Al Kebir (Great House) is amongst its most significant monumental remains. This monument of many names is also known as Beit Al Sayeda Thoraya. Whatever its title it stands as a splendid historical testament, with its unique engravings and feats of design. It is composed of several lobbies and colonnaded galleries and is three storeys high.

Also here are the stronghold and citadel of Al Fatah and

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Al Seeb lies to the west of the Wilayat of Bowshar, occupying an narrow strip of coastline along the rim of the Gulf of Oman for a distance of 50 kms. Its population is around 223,267 persons distributed among 24 villages and townships. The Wilayat incorporates a number of sites of historical interest, the most significant of these being the citadel of Al Khodh, Jifnin, Raseel, Al Kharas and Al Saleel Towers as well as the towers of Wadi Al Haya. It has two walls, one of which, Sur Jimma, proved useful in the defence of the township of Wadi Al Lawami 200 years ago. The second, Sur Al Rawia, known as Beit Al Rawia or Al Rawia House, consists of six chambers and a liwan. It was built some 150 years ago. Beit Al Awad or Al Awad House is at Al Khodh. Founded in 1886 AD, it has a floor area of 1,200 sq. meters. 

Wilayat Al Seeb has around 140 mosques. One of the most significant sights in this Wilayat are the districts of Al Manuma, Al Khodh (interior), the coast of Al Hail, the Daymaniyat Islands, Al Khodh Park, Al Sahwa Tower Al

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This Wilayat is situated south of Muttrah and south west of Quriyat. It runs south west along the direction of the watercourse of the Wadi Al Sireen at the end of Seeh. To the east is Muscat at the two towns of Marazeh and Yiti. To the west is Bowshar from which it is separated by a chain of mountains. Its population is 40,868 living in six principal villages: Al Amerat, the township of Al Hajer, the township of Jahlout, the township of Wadi Al Meeh, Wadi Al Sireen and the city of Nahda. The Wilayat of Al Amerat with its 81 mosques was known in the past as Al Fatah and elsewhere as Al Mutahadamat, until the transformations of the Renaissance period brought with them a new and more appropriate name.

This Wilayat has both archaeological and tourist landmarks, the most noteworthy of which are the lead mines, the red ochre quarry, Beit Saharij, Wadi Sireen Nature Preserve, Wadi Al Meeh (Al Lajam) the Ghar Hadhadha Cave, the steep zigzag incline of Jebel Saqif and the Safah Al Bab well at the fool of the mountain.

The district has 61 aflaj and 57 wadis or

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Quriyat occupies a narrow strip of coastline along the Arabian Gulf, the Wilayat of Muscat to the north and to the south east the Eastern Region Wilayats of Sur. South west is Dimma and Al Ta'iyeen, also in the Eastern Region. Eastwards is the Arabian Gulf. The name Quriyat is probably derived from Quriyat, the plural of the word qariya or village. It was settled by a number of tribes before the advent of Islam and another set of tribes arrived after Islam, between the sixth and eighth centuries AH. The Wilayat has 29 villages and towns, including the town of Quriyat itself. These are Al Hajer, Al Wasta, Al Ma'ala, Al Jinan, AI Sahel Al Ainein, Killiat, Affa', Al Kerib, Al Ramla, Al Makhasrat, Al Shahbari, Dhaher Muhaisa, Hail Al Ghaf, Al Masfaa and the Municipalities of Daghmar, Mazar'ia Al Abraiyeen, Al Misfa'ah, Al Hiytan and Al Abayaa.

The village of Dhabbab (meaning fog or mist) and Suq lie to the east of the Wilayat. The western villages are Sawaqim, Al Falij, Qatnit, Al Samir, Makhada, Al Haboubia, Seeh Al Basra or Seeh Al Gharizia, Al Ramitha, Hayfadh (Al Atb), Al Aafia, Al Salil, Al Fayadh,

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The Wilayat of Khasab is located in the furthest north of the Governorate of Musandam. It lies between the two Wilayats of Dibba and Bukha, overlooking the Gulf of Oman in the east and the Arabian Sea in the north west. It also overlooks the Straits of Hormuz, the strategic waterway through which 90% of the oil production of the Gulf region passes to the international consumers. This area of the Gulf has a tortuous fjord-like coastline. It contains about 136 villages on the coasts and in the mountains. Its name is attributed to the fertility (khasab) of its rich land with its fresh subterranean water, which flows down through the great wadis when rain falls. There are a number of castles, forts and towers. The castle of Khasab dates back to the beginning of the era of Al Busaid. It was renovated at the beginning of 1990 by the Ministry of National Heritage and Culture.
The exact date of construction of Khasab Al Kamazara is not known, it is located in the village of Al Kamazara. There are also three towers, Al Siba which is located in the place of the same name, the tower of Kabas

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Located on the coast of the Arabian Gulf, on the west side of the Wilayat of Khasab it neighbors the Emirate of Ras Al Khaima in the west. It contains approximately 86 villages. There are a number of touristic attractions. The fort of Al Bilad, in the centre of the Wilayat was built in 1250 AH. There is also the fort of Al Qala'a, located on a mountain top which can be clearly seen from all over the Wilayat; also a .ruined mosque in the west of the Wilayat, together with two castles and a spring in the village of Al Jadi. There are also many caves in the mountains.
Traditional occupations
The most important occupations are black smithery and agriculture, producing dates, citrus fruit and fruit. The traditional industries are making small fishing boats, fishing nets and handicrafts from palm leaves.

 

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It is located in the south east of the governorate, to the north and west are mountain ranges linking it to the other parts of the region, in the east is the Gulf of Oman, and in the south the U.A.E. It contains about 114 villages. Al Asma'i says that it was one of the Arab markets in Oman. The Muslims conquered it in the era of the Caliph Abu Bakr Al Sadiq in the 11th year of the Hijra. Ka'ab Bin Suar Bin Bakr is one of the region's famous men, a leader and a scholar, he became Judge of Basra during the era of the Caliph Omar Bin Al Khatab, and Al Muhallab Bin Abi Sufra, was a leader of the Muslim armies at the time of the Umayya State. In the modern era Sheikh Salih Bin Mohammed Al Kamzari Al Shahi is famous, and was mentioned in the book "Dangers of Exploration in the Arabian Peninsula" by William Thomas.
One of the historical features of the Wilayat of Dibba is the castle called 'Al Siba' which was restored in the age of His Majesty Sultan Qaboos. There is also the castle of 'Sabtaan' and the

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Located in the north of the Sultanate it neighbours the Emirate of Ras Al Khaima in the west, the Emirate of Sharjah in the north and the Emirate of Fujairah in the South. IIt contains about 10 villages. Human settlement there goes back more than 3,500 years. There are many ancient rock paintings, making it into a natural museum, with drawings which go back to before Islam. There are also paintings and writings which go back to the first centuries of the Hijra. In addition there are a number of ruins which date back to the Iron Age and the years between 1000 and 1500 years B.C. The Wilayat is famous for a number of secret storage places, beneath the earth, which the people there call "Makhazan Al Jahal". 
In addition there is an abundance of graves, the most outstanding being the one of Hajar Bani Humaid which has paintings on its white marble tombstone together with the names of the dead. There are also a number of forts, castles and towers in Mudha, Al Ghuana and Hajar Bani Humaid scattered on the mountain tops.

The Wilayat is distinguished geographically by its mountainous nature. It is one

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When he visited Sohar, al Maqdisi described it as "the gateway to the east a prosperous, beautiful city and a pleasant place to live with a large number of inhabitants." He noted that its residential areas were strung out along the shore and that its mosque, which overlooked the sea, had a tall minaret and a mihrab that changed colour because it was plated with copper. In his book Mu'jam al Buldan (Geographical Dictionary) Yaqut al Hamawi refers to Sohar as "the kasbah of Oman", while al Farisi, author of Hudud al 'Alam (Boundaries of the World) describes it as "the market-place of the whole world." In his book Al Masalik wa'1 Mamalik (The Roads and Countries) al Istakhri says it is rich and beautiful - a description which indicates that even at that time it was economically prosperous and a haven for the ships that plied the Arabian Sea. Amr bin al `As - the Companion of the Prophet who brought the Prophet's message to Abd and Jaifar, the sons of al Julanda and kings of Oman, inviting them to embrace Islam - visited Sohar in the 3rd year of the Hijrah/624AD.In later years, Sohar was one

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Although the Wilayat of Shinas is right up at the far end of the Batinah North Governorate on the Sultanate's northern border, it has enjoyed just as many of the benefits of modern development as the rest of Oman's wilayats. It has numerous tourist attractions, a lively commercial scene and a thriving agricultural sector and, thanks to its seaside location, it also has an important commercial sea-port. Its land is fertile and watered by flowing aflaj and it produces a wide variety of fruit and vegetables.Shinas is the "bottle-neck" of the Batinah North Governorate and it is through this wilayat that much of the overland traffic and trade passes between the Sultanate and the other Arab Gulf Co-operation Council states. It borders on the Gulf of Oman to the east and the Wilayat of Mahdhah to the west and the south. It is 300 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat and its beautiful coast extends from Khatmat Malahah in the north to al Dawaneej in the south.
The wilayat's history is reflected in old buildings like Shinas Fort near the souq. The fort's rectangular keep is surrounded by a perimeter wall with a tower at each of its

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When our thoughts turn to the Wilayat of Liwa, we think of the smallest and lightest of unsinkable ships, or the Baobab tree with its pain-killing powers, or the wilayat's tourist attractions like the mountain village of Qazah.With its 58 villages, Liwa is 270 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat, just beyond the Wilayat of Sohar and on the strip of coast that ends at the Wilayat of Shinas. It has numerous castles, forts and towers including Liwa Fort with its three towers, the recently-restored Qazah Fort - a fine three-storey citadel 15 metres high and 14 metres wide with four rooms on each floor - and Awlad Ya'rub Fort - an architectural gem in the village of Harmul. Liwa's white coral limestone mosques are an unusual feature of this area with their ventilation holes like small windows high up in their walls. Some of these mosques have attractive minarets; the prettiest is the minaret of al Bahlul mosque in Hillat al Husn.
The mosque of al Rabi' bin Habib in the village of Ghadhfan is named after one of the Hadith narrators of the early part of the 2nd century AH/8th century AD, who lived in this

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There is nothing odd about the fact that the Wilayat of Saham has adopted the lime tree as its emblem, because, despite its seafaring tradition, it has also been renowned throughout its history as a centre of citrus fruit cultivation. The Wilayat of Saham extends from Qasabat Breik in the south to Majaz al Sughra in the north. It borders on the Wilayat of al Musana'ah to the south and the Wilayat of Sohar to the north, and it is 200 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat. With its 66 villages it has a high population density. Saham occupies a central geographical position half way along the Batinah coast and links the north and south of the Sultanate as well as the Batinah North Governorate with the wilayats of Yanqul and Ibri in the Dhahirah Governorate. It has numerous sites of historical interest including the recently-restored Souq Fort. 
Much of the wilayat is under cultivation, the main farm land being around the villages of Wadi Bani Umar, al Fulaij and al Rawdhah, and in the rural areas beside the mountains. Saham's 23 aflaj are fed by the wadis of Wadi Ahen, Wadi al Mahmoom, Wadi al Sarmi, Wadi

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The Wilayat of al Khabourah is 178 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat and borders on the Wilayat of al Suwaiq to the east, the Wilayat of Sohar to the west, the Wilayat of Ibri to the south and the blue seas of the Gulf of Oman to the north. It has 76 villages.Al Khabourah has seven castles (the best-known of these is the castle of Bani Said), as well as twenty-one forts including al Khabourah Fort - a square building beside the sea with a round tower and a heavy wooden gate, which was restored in the year 2000. Date-palms, limes and fruit trees can be found in abundance in the wilayat's well-watered wadis and around the small villages that lie halfhidden among the mountains. Traces of the past may be seen in Wadi al Hawasinah and Wadi al Sarmi, famed for their fresh water springs and aflaj. Wadi al Hawasinah is one of al Khabourah's best-known and most fertile wadis and its mountain setting makes it a magnet for visitors. 
Among the most attractive of its thirty villages are Hijjah, al Rafi'ah, al Badi'ah (with its old dam, which is 200 metres long, four metres high

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Visitors never realise that the Wilayat of al Suwaiq is one of the biggest commercial markets in the Batinah North Governorate, that it is known locally for its numerous souqs and that the town is full of modem shops. They are also generally unaware of the fact that the emblem of this coastal wilayat is a four-legged desert-browsing ship - in other words, a camel. These are two of the anomalies about this place. Firstly, the name of the wilayat - al Suwaiq - is a diminutive of ,souq, despite the fact that there have always been numerous souqs in the town and its surrounding villages. Secondly, despite the fact that sea-going vessels anchor off its beautiful shore, the wilayat's emblem is a ship of the desert. However, the visitor will find that these anomalies evaporate once he sees this beautiful wilayat and its prosperous town or bathes in its clear blue water and he will forget his cares if he goes out into the countryside and visits places like the sprawling ancient village of al Hailain, nestling between high mountains and bisected by a wadi of date groves and junipers. With one hundred villages, Al Suwaiq

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With 75,501 inhabitants, the Wilayat of Barka is the first of the beautiful havens along the Batinah's fertile coast. It borders on the wilayats of Seeb to the south, al Musana'ah to the north and Wadi'al Ma'awil to the south, and the Gulf of Oman to the east. It has 63 villages and 29 schools with 21,858 male and female students. The wilayat has 38 forts, towers and other ancient buildings, including the forts of Barka, al Felaij and Bait al Nu'man.Al Felaij Fort Theatre is in a pretty village and is one of the district's tourist attractions. A few years ago it was just an abandoned fort, but today it stages performances by leading Arab and international theatre companies.Al Sawadi beach, in the Wilayat of Barka and about twenty Kilometres from Barka itself, is one of the Sultanate's most popular and attractive beaches and its three rocky offshore islands provide a refuge for migrant birds like herons, black-headed gulls and waders which stop there in January and February every year. Visitors to al Sawadi also have a chance to observe the crabs and other marine life in its lagoon.To reach al Sawadi beach you drive for

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Nestling beneath the soaring peaks of the Western Hajar mountains, the Wilayat of Rustaq borders on the Wilayat of al Awabi the the east, Ibri is to the west, al Musana'ah to the north and the slopes of al Jabal al Akhdhar to the south. It is 150 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat and its population of 67,641 lives in Rustaq itself and its 170 villages. It has two niyabats - al Hawqain and Wadi Bani Hinai - and numerous enchanting wadis where the visitor can stroll among springs and lush palm groves. Among the best known of these wadis are Wadi Sahtan, Wadi Bani Ghafir, Wadi Bani Awf, Wadi al Haimli and Wadi Hajir Bani Umar. The wilayat has 200 aflaj including Falaj al Maisar -the oldest - Falaj al Sayighi, and Falaj al Kamil, which is a truly brilliant feat of engineering.
The Ya'ariba understood the importance of obtaining good drinking water from their wadis and underground springs, just as they recognized the dangers of salinity on the Batinah plain. In tackling the problem they looked to the future and realised that the solution lay in digging a falaj to carry water from Rustaq to

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The Wilayat of al 'Awabi is very similar to its neighbours, with its flowing wadis, mountain villages, fresh water springs and ancient buildings. Its best-known wadi is Wadi Bani Kharus, which extends as far as the beautiful village of al Aliya.
The Wilayat of al 'Awabi's emblem is a pen, an inkwell and a book. Over the years it has produced numerous scholars, poets and imams - the imams of Bani Kharus including al Warith bin Ka'b, al Salt bin Malik and Azzan bin Tamim, to name but a few - as well as men of letters like the poet Salim bin Ghassan al Lawah, and scholars like Abu Nabhan Ja'id bin Khamis al Kharusi who lived in the village of al Aliya where his mosque, his house and his tomb can be seen to this day.
Al 'Awabi has many old buildings and mosques including al Ghamamah Mosque in at Hajar village in Wadi Bani Kharus, forts like al Awabi Fort, al Rami Fort and al Salut Fort, and a number of towers.Al 'Awabi's most distinctive feature is the mountain range of the Western Hajar which overshadows it, forming a gigantic wall beneath which the wilayat sleeps

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The Wilayat of Nakhl is famed for Ain al Thuwwarah - a fresh water spring that bubbles up through the rocks below the surface of the earth. There are numerous other springs nearby, all of which flow into one wadi. The wilayat gets its name - Nakhl - from the fact that the ground on which it stands "filters" the water. Ain al Thuwwarah, Nakhl's main attraction, receives visitors from far and wide at weekends and on holidays. They come to sit for hours, watching the water welling up from beneath the ground and flowing along the wadi and through the date palms.The Wilayat of Nakhl is 120 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat. To get there, you turn south at the Barka Roundabout towards the villages of Wadi'l Ma'awil and drive straight on until you see Nakhl's imposing old 200-foot-high fort in the distance in front of you. The fort, which is built on a rocky hill, is easily accessible since the asphalt road leads right up to its gate. There is a splendid view from its balconies, from where it is possible to see several of the wilayat's 74 villages scattered over the hills and plains,

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The Wilayat of al Musana'ah has no factories as Ithe root of its name (masaani), might appear to suggest. However, it has something much more valuable - the riches of nature, and these can not be produced by any factory.In earlier times al Musana'ah was renowned for certain traditional industries such as the production of indigo, which was used to dye women's garments. It was also well-known for its sugarcane presses - a reflection of the fertility of its soil and the abundance of its water. The belt of trees along the edge of the desert - such as the evergreen rak (tooth brush tree) which the wilayat has adopted as its emblem - provides further evidence of the blessings nature has bestowed on al Musana'ah. The Wilayat of al Musana'ah is 160 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat. It borders on the Wilayat of Rustaq to the south, the Wilayat of Barka to the east, the Wilayat of al Suwaiq to the west and the Gulf of Oman to the north. It has a population of 56,659 and thirty villages. Despite the fact that it is beside the sea and has a seafaring history, another aspect

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Eight villages are strung out neatly along either side of Wadi'l Ma'awil - Afiy (the centre of the wilayat), Habra, al Wasit, al Tawiyah, Muslimat, at Maraighah, at Lajal and at Ghubrah. The Wilayat of Wadi'l Ma'awil also comprises some of the Wadi Mistal villages - Amsa, al Hail, Jama, at Jilah, Hasma, Qays, Miyaqa' Wardat Muwaizah, at Shabik, at Safa at Abyadh and at Mutali'.Wadi'l Ma'awil is 115 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat and borders on the wilayats of Barka to the north, al Awabi to the south, Nakhl to the east and Rustaq to the west. It has numerous sites of historical interest including the forts of Hajarat at Sheikh, Bait at Matma', al Mitla', at Hajarah (in the village of Muslimat), Habra, al Hail, Bani Sulaimah, at Sharjah, al `Aali, at Sharqi, al Muhaidith, at Mahyul, Bait at Khandaq, and at Rowshan (in the old quarter of the village of Muslimat). There are also fifteen towers in the wilayat including the towers of at Hajarah, Shamis, al Muqairshiyah, at Souq, at Hail, Sabah Raf'ah, at 'Uyunah, al Shamisi, Miftah and al Suwaifih. The mosques of Al Safalah and at Hajarah are two of the oldest mosques

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Dhank lies at the centre of the Dhahirah Governorate. Its neighbours are the Wilayats of Buraimi to the north and west, Ibri to the south and west, and Yanqul to the east The wilayat has a distinguished history. It has 16.622 inhabitants and 48 villages. The imams of earlier times took an interest in Dhank, as can be seen today in Falaj al Bazili in the west of the Wilayat and the "Imam's Fort" in its central area. Falaj al Bazili was constructed by Imam Saif bin Sultan AI Yarubi, who cultivated extensive areas around it, while the "Imam's Fort" was renovated by Imam Azzan bin Qais. Ibn al Rumtha built Al Oud Fort in Safalat al Wahshi. Other forts in the Wilayat include al Shiraya', al Subaikha, al Marqu', al 'Aqr, Doot, al Jafrah, Balat, al Khilli and al Fath.
There are also six towers: al Saghar, al Taff, al Ghafah, al Khilli, Abu Kariyah and al Qala'ah. Wadi Dhank is one of the Wilayat's main tourist sites. Other popular spots are Wadi al Fath and Wadi Qumaira. The Wilayat is well endowed with falajes underground water resources and springs. Its falajes include al Sadd, al Sima,

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Ibri's northern neighbours are the wilayats of Saham and Rustaq in the Batinah North Governorate, while the wilayats of Yanqul, Dhank and Buraimi lie to the north-west. To the south are the Wilayats of Adam, in the Dakhiliyah Governorate, and Haima, in the Wusta Governorate. Saudi Arabia, the Empty Quarter and the United Arab Emirates lie to the west. In the past trading caravans used to pass through it, as did several major land routes linking the Sultanate with the other Gulf States. It may have acquired its name - Ibri - from the Arabic root "a-b-r", which conveys the connotation of "crossing" or "traversing". Ibri today is known for its oil and gas fields - which provide one of the country's main sources of income. The Wilayat of Ibri is also well-known for its ancient sites, including forts and towers as well as the ruinsa Bat - the second Omani site to be listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site after Bahla Fort in the Dakhiliyah Governorate.
Bat lies in the eastern part of the Wilayat of IV Bat's historical importance lies in its location at the crossroads of the old trade routes, along which caravan

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When you enter the Wilayat of Yanqul the first thing you will see is the mountain of Jabal al Hawra - which the wilayat has adopted as its emblem - standing guard over Yanqul like a sentry.
It is so named because its color is like the color of the houris, who are famed for their beautiful pink complexions. It borders on the Wilayat of Ibri to the south and east, the Wilayat of Dank to the west and the Wilayat of Sohar to the north. It has around 70 villages. Tourist attractions in the Wilayat of Yanqul include the enchanting Wadi al Rakiy with its trees and fine views. The village of Sudairain is renowned for its abundant water and beautiful scenery, while al Waqbah village is known for its many wadis and cool temperatures. The village of Baiha is also famous for its fantastic scenery. 
Its wadi, which flows from the mountains, is its best-known feature. Of the wilayat's numerous of aflaj, the best known are Falaj al 'Ulu, Falaj al Muhaidith and Falaj al Khabourah.

 

Traditional Occupations
Agriculture provides one of the main traditional means of livelihood and a wide range of crops are produced including dates, wheat,

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Wilayat Al Buraimi is the regional center of the Governorate located 375 kilometers from the capital Muscat . It has a number of historic forts and houses. Its main forts are al Khandaq, which has been adopted as the emblem of the Wilayat, and Al Hillah Fort. Both these forts have recently been restored by the Ministry of National Heritage and Culture. There are also several other forts, including the forts of al Fayyadh, Hafeet and Wadi al Jizzi. The most famous historic house in the Wilayat is Bait Bahr. Buraimi's villages are watered by 49 falajes. Much of the rest of the Wilayat is sandy desert. 


Traditional Occupations
Farming is one of the Wilayat's chief occupations. The farms depend on wells and falajes for their water and grow mainly dates, limes and other fruits, and animal fodder. Some of the people of the Wilayat also breed livestock.

 

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Formerly known as the Sinainah Procuratorate and the issuance of Royal Decree No. 108 / 2006 raise the administrative level on behalf of Sinainah to the wilayat, so it know now Wilayat Al Sinainah.
Traditional Occupations
It is famous for camel races eligibility, as well as spinning and weaving.

 

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Mahdhah is bordered by the Wilayat of Buraimi and the United Arab Emirates to the south and by the Emirates of Dubai, Sharjah, Ajman and Ras al Khaimah. To the east a chain of mountains separates it from the Batinah South Governorate. It has 9,002 inhabitants and ninety-nine villages.

The Wilayat of Mahdhah has produced personalities who have played distinguished roles in Oman's history. The best known was Ahmed bin Nu'man al Ka'abi, who was the first Arab ambassador to the United States of America in 1840.
Its main historic landmarks are the forts of Ubul, Bait al Nad, al Khabib and Qala'at Sharm.

Tourist sites include Wadi Sharm, Wadi al Qahafi, al Lajj, Uyul, al Ubailah, al Khadhra, al Jazira and Jabal al Howraa.


Traditional Occupations
Local occupations and crafts include spinning, weaving and palm-weave products. 

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The Wilayat of Adam is in the south of the Dakhiliyah Governorate and borders on the wilayats of Bahla, Manah and lzki to the north, Mahawt and Haima to the south, al Mudhaibi to the east and Ibri to the west. It is 234 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat . It has a large number of villages and bedouin settlements, as well as green oases, orchards, farms, old mosques, souqs, residential quarters and archaeological sites. Travellers bound for the Wusta Governorate and the Governorate of Dhofar stop off in Adam.  The mountain of Jabal al Midhmar to the north of Adam and Jabal Salkh to the west are among the most attractive tourist spots in the Wilayat of Adam with their trees, grassy slopes, gazelles, hares, foxes and other wild animals. In the summer months the bedouin of the Wusta Governorate migrate to the Wilayat of Adam for the date harvest and build temporary palm-frond shelters to protect themselves from the heat. At night the glow of their lamps and the distant bleating of their sheep and goats impart an inimitable charm to the scene.
Over the years the bedouin have established small settlements which they return

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Jabal Shams, the village of Misfah, al Hootah Cave, Hasat bin Salt, Bait al Safa and Bait al Shari'ah are the main tourist attractions in the Wilayat of al Hamra, which lies in the north-western part of the Jabal al Akhdhar range. It borders on the Wilayat of Nizwa to the east and the Wilayat of Bahla to the south. Its inhabitants live in the centre of the wilayat and the villages of al Mensur, al Sahmah, al Qaryah, Dhat Khail, Tawi Saleem, Dar al Khair and al 'Aridh, to name but a few. It is renowned for its wadis, aflaj, gardens and orchards, while the mountain of Jabal Shams, which rises to 12,000 feet above sea level, is its most significant natural feature. It can be reached via the Wadi Ghul road, from which it is possible to see the stone village of Sabt Bani Khamis perched on the edge of a cliff beneath a huge overhanging rock. The slopes of the mountain are covered with buu and nimt (Sageretia spiciflora) trees, junipers, wild olives, milkweed and other plants, and the air is cool and refreshig.
A resthouse with several rooms has been built on the mountain and is

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Bahla is one of the oldest towns in the Sultanate. Archaeologists working on an excavation programme in Bisya and al Ghubrah discovered sites dating from the third millennium BC, while an old falaj found at al Ghubrah - in Wadi Bahla - is also believed to date from the third millennium BC. The Wilayat of Bahla is 200 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat. It borders on the wilayats of Nizwa to the east, Ibri to the west, Adam to the south and al Hamra to the north. With a population of 51,278 and, a variety of natural features including wadis, springs and mountains, its villages include Bilad Sait, al Ghafat, Bisya, Seefam, al Habbi, al Ma'mur and numerous others. The best-known of its wadis are Wadi Quriyat, Wadi al A'la, Wadi al Nakhr, Wadi al Shar' and Wadi Bahla, and its springs include Wadhdhah, al Huwaidhar and Ain Seefam. The mountain of Jabal al Kawr with its shrubs and fruit trees is one of the wilayat's most distinctive mountains and lies on the border between the Dakhiliyah and Dhahirah Governorates. From a distance it looks like a huge dome. There are several villages, caves,wadis and springs on

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Bidbid's most striking feature is its flyovers, which provide the only means of access to the main arterial roads which transit the wilayat, and it has adopted them as its emblem. Travellers will also be struck by the palm groves which grow along the banks of the wadi in the village of Fanja and surround the more distant villages of al Amqat and Hamim like puffs of green cloud. The Wilayat of Bidbid has been described as the "smiling mouth" of the Dakhiliyah Governorate and the crossroads between the Governorate of Muscat and the Sharqiyah, Dakhilyah, Dhahirah and Wusta Governorates and the Governorate of Dhofar. Everyone travelling from any of these Governorates to Muscat has to pass over the Fanja flyover, which is a reliable, fast road even during the rainy season. Now that the main dual carriageway has been completed, a second flyover has been built over Wadi Fanja, so that it now has two flyovers. Around 70 Kilometres from the city of Muscat, the Wilayat of Bidbid lies beneath the Hajar mountain range where it divides into the Western Hajar and the Eastern Hajar. It borders on the wilayats of Sumail to the south, Dima wa'l

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The Wilayat of Izki has some of the oldest sit4s in the Dakhiliyah Governorate. The remains of buildings and tombs from an ancient civilization thousands of years old, which can be seen on the hilltops neighbouring the village of Zakeet, include a number of small round towers similar to the towers of the Bat culture. The Wilayat of lzki - 130 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat - lies beneath the slopes of the mountain massif of the Jabal at Akhdhar, which forms its western border. It borders on the wilayats of Manah and Nizwa to the west and south, Sumail to the north and some villages of the Wilayat of al Mudhaibi to the east. Some of the better-known of its 26 villages include Zakeet, al Qaryatain, Seema, Muqazzah, Qala'at al Awamir, Habl al Hadid, Umtay and Qarut.
Apart from its ancient monuments, the wilayat's most distinctive features are wadis and open desert. It has numerous forts, castles, towers and old residential quarters, the most important of which is Izki Fort, which lies between the villages of Nizar and al Yaman and is said to have been built during the reign of Sultan Said bin bin Sultan

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The Wilayat of Manah has several old buildings including forts, towers, mosques and attractive residential quarters. Particularly impressive is the old quarter in the village of Harat al Bilad with its traditional houses, mosques, wells, springs, perimeter wall and other features. Surrounded by date palms, it has been chosen by the University of Liverpool in the United Kingdom as a typical example of Omani architecture. The Wilayat of Manah is 160 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat and comprises eight villages:- Harat al Bilad, Mu'ammad, al Ma'arra, 'Izz, al Faiqain, al Mahiyul, Abu Nakhilah and Mitan. It borders on the wilayats of Adam to the south, Izki to the north and east, and Nizwa to the west.
The road to Manah branches off the Nizwa-Salalah highway, though it can also be reached by the minor road which links the villages of al Mahiyul and Zakeet in the Wilayat of lzki. As you approach Manah, you will be greeted by the sight of its immense forts, including the recently-restored fort of al Faiqain, and the now-ruined Harat al Bilad with its mud houses, and tangle of arcades and alleyways. There are three imposing mosques in al Bilad with patterned

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The Wilayat of Nizwa's ancient city streets and buildings filled with the ghosts of the past contrast with the pretty terraced mountain villages, thickets, orchards and aflaj of its niya-bat of the Jabal al Akhdhar. Nizwa is the capital of the Dakhiliyah and its busy souq, which serves people from all over the region, is both a tourist attraction and a commercial centre.

The Wilayat of Nizwa borders on the wilayats of Adam, Manah and lzki to the south and east and al Hamra and Bahla to the west. From the north it is overlooked by the mountain peaks of the Jabal al Akhdhar. It is 170 Kilometres from the Governo ate of Muscat.Its main features are its huge fort (known as al Shahba'}.
The design of the renovated old souq blends in harmoniously with the Friday mosque and the fort. The wilayat has a large number of villages as well as two niyabats - Birkat al Mawz and the Jabal al Akhdhar. The Niyabat of Birkat al Mawz is renowned for its fine old buildings and the village is typical of an Omani village at its prettiest and most charming. The recently restored two-storied fort of

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The Wilayat of Sumail is a natural paradise, a fragrant, shady garden with a lush wadi with cultivated plots along its banks that flows like a river through the middle of it dividing it in two. Wherever the visitor looks he will see date palms. The wilayat is famous for its dates and it has adopted the fardh date palm as its emblem.
The Wilayat of Sumail is almost half way between the Wilayat of Nizwa (75 Kilometres) and the Governorate of Muscat (85 Kilometres). It borders on the Wilayat of Bidbid to the north, the Western Hajar mountain range to the west, the Wilayat of Izki to the south and some outlying villages of the Wilayat of Dima wa'l Ta'een to the east. It has a large number of historic buildings including forts, castles and towers.
Some of the wilayat's better-known wadis - such as Wadi Bani Rawahah and Wadi Mahram, or Wadi al Sijani with its orchards of sweet oranges - are relatively densely populated with fertile villages. There are around 73 villages in the wilayat including Falaj al Maraghah, Suroor, Seeja, Hail, al Hoob, Luzugh, al Swaireej, al Jeelah, al Khubar and al Madrah. For

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In the north it neighbours the Wilayats of Bidbid and Sumail, which are part of the Dakhaliya Governorate, and Ibra and Al Qabil which are part of the Sharqiya Governorates, in the south the Wilayat of Mahut, which is part of the Wusta Governorate, in the east the Wilayats of Badiya and Ja'alaan Bani Bu Hasan and Ja'alan Bani Bu 'Ali, and in the west the Wilayats of lzki and Adam, which are part of the Dhakaliya Governorate. There are about 90 villages . Its history goes back thousands of years, according to what archaeologists have discovered in Samad Al Shaan.Some of its archeological features are: the castle of Al Jawabir in the town of Al Rawdha, the two forts Kabeeb and Khazam in Samad Al Shaan, the fort of Al 'Aqir, the castle of Al Busa'idi in the town of Al Akhdar, and Burj Warid and the houses of Mutowa where the Wilayat meets the Wilayat of Ibra. The most outstanding mosques of the Wilayat are Al Sawar in Al Mudaibi, and the Al Jam'aa Mosque in Samad Al Shaan. There are a number of tourist attractions, natural springs, falaj, caves and modern places of amusement. Read More..


In the north is the Wilayat of Ibra, to the south the Wilayat of Badiya, in the north east it neighbours the Wilayat of Dima and Al Taaiyin, in the south east Wadi Bani Khalid and in the west the Wilayat of Al Mudaibi. It contains about 21 villages. There are about 69 archaeological sites, the most important being two forts, one of them in Al Qabil and the other in Al Mudirab. There are about 50 falaj, the most important being: Al Mudirab, Al Qabil, Al Direez and Al Nabaa. It is also famous for a number of villages which are located between the high, golden sand dunes. The most important of these villages are Al Sakaa, Al 'Aqida, Al Kharis and Al Jufaa. 
There are also a number of springs in the Wilayat. The most important are: 'Ain Marzuk, known for water, 'Ain Wadi Barka and 'Ain Al Washal. The falaj, springs and villages located in the middle of the sand dunes are tourist attractions


Traditional occupations
The people of the Wilayat are famous for a number of occupations, industries and traditional songs. Agriculture is their main occupation. The most important products are

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This Wilayat is almost in the middle of the Sharqiya, north of it is the Wilayat of AI Qabil and in the east it neighbours the Wilayats of Al Kamil and Al Wafi and Wadi Bani Khalid.I contains about 15 villages. Story tellers relate that it was established when the Hajjaris (who are the majority of the inhabitants) arrived there. That was in 1008 A.H. They built castles and forts, and they made a number of falaj, before which the Wilayat was reliant on wells. This stage "the descending of the Hajjaris" was considered the beginning of its prosperity and so they called it "Badiya" (the beginning) - thus relate the story tellers .One of the most important sites, in the Wilayat of Badiya is the fort which the Ministry of National Heritage and Culture restored recently; It is the fort of Al Mintarib. 
There is also the fortress of Al Wasil. This is surrounded by four towers, in addition to three other forts, which are called Al Shaariq, Al Hawiya and Al Ghabi.
Added to the tourist attractions of the Wilayat are the falaj, springs and other pleasant places. The most important falaj are Al Mintarib,

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 In the north it neighbours the Wilayat of Quriyat, which is part of the Governorate of Muscat, in the south the Wilayat of Ibra, in the east the Wilayats of Al Qabil and Badiya and in the west the Wilayats of Al Mudaibi and Bidbid, which is part of the Dakhaliya. It contains about 51 villages. The story-tellers say the people of the area once reared Arab horses and exported them to markets in India, by sea. They also traded them internally to other parts of the Sultanate and other areas thus the story-tellers relate. The name Wadi Taaiyin goes back to the time of the collapse of the Ma'rab Dam in the Yemen, when the Arab tribes fled to various places. The Ta'a tribe, part of the Al Qahtaaina tribe descended through Wadi Sma'il then came out to Wadi Al Taaiyin, where they settled. 

Some of the Al 'Udnaaniya trib also reached the wadi which is named for them. What about the name "Wadi Dima" The story-tellers say that the Wadi witnessed many local wars, which shed much blood (dima) and that the name of the Wadi goes back to thos events. The Wilayat of Dima

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Ibra - the regional center - is an agricultural wilayat. It also has some crafts and traditional industries. As regards Masirah Island which is in the Arabian Sea, it is distinguished for its strategic location and for the massive and different species of turtles which lay and hatch their eggs in the coasts of the island.Ibra In the north and west it neighbors the Wilayat of Al Mudaibi, in the south the Wilayat of Qabil, and in the east the Wilayat of Dima and Taaiyin.It contains about  70 villages. There are a number of archaeological features, castles, forts, towers and ancient mosques.There is only one castle, Al Dhahir, which is in the Al Yahmadi area which has recently been restored by the Ministry of National Culture and Heritage.

There are five forts : Al Shubbak, Farifar, Al Daghsha, Al Yahmadi and Bait Al Qasimi .There are also nine towers: Al Qatabi, Al Naasiri, Al Qala'a, Al Mansur, Al Nataala, Al Qarin, San'aa, Al Safah and Burj Al QarunThe most important mosque is the is the Al  'Aqaba Mosque, which was built at the foot of Jabal Al Naasiri. Its mihrab faces Jerusalem and it is from this

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In the west it neighbours the Wilayats of Badiya and Al Qabil, in the east the Wilayat of Sur, in the south the Wilayat of Al Kamil and Al Waafi, and in the north the Wilayat Dima and Al Taaiyin. It contains about 30 villages. It is famous for a number of archaeological sites. There are some forts, the most important being: Hasan AI Muwalik in the village of Al 'Awina, which dates back to the 4 th century A.H., the biggest fort in the Wilayat and in the past was the base of the Wali and the Judge, the fort of Al 'Adafin in the village of Qaswah, and the fort of Al Raziqiyeen in the village of Al Husun. All in addition to other forts of which only ruins remain. There are also 9 towers.The Wilayat has many tourist features. The main one is the cave of Maqal, where water falls from holes, then bursts out with a gurgling sound into a pool. 
It disappears again and finally collects into lakes which the people distribute into three falaj. The Wilayat chose this cave as its emblem. Other tourist attractions are the springs, of which the

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In the north it neighbours the Wilayat of Wadi Bani Khalid, in the west the Wilayat of Badiya in the south the Wilayat of Ja'alan Bani Bu Hasan and in the east the Wilayat of Sur.It contains about 40 villages and towns.There are about 80 castles. The most outstanding mosques are the Al Jam'aa Mosque, in the village of Al Waafi, and Al Shariya Mosque in Al Kamil, which was built by the Ministry of Justice, Awqaf and Islamic Affairs. In addition there is the mosque in the villages of Saiq and a number of other mosques in various parts of the Wilayat. The Wilayat of Al Kamil and Al Waafi has a number of natural areas with running water which are important tourist attractions. Among them are the village of Saiq, Al Baatin, Mazra', Tahuh and Wadi Laa. 
Natural springs, and among them 'Ain AlRasa, 'Ain Falaj Yastan, and 'Ain Falaj Simoud are also considered tourist attractions. There are other springs that only flow when there has been much rain.

 

Traditional occupations
A number of occupations, industries and traditional songs are practised here. The occupations are: spinning, weaving clothes, making horse saddles and

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It is located in the south east part of the Sultanate and is one of the biggest Wilayats. It is a mix of three different geographical environments. What are they? The first is the coastal area of the Wilayat, the second, the desert area and the third, the agricultural area. This mix of environments provides the inhabitants with a variety of incomes. It contains about 137 villages. The coast stretches more than 170 kilometres, from Ras Al Hadd in the north to Ras Al Ruwais in the south; and scattered throughout are inhabited areas. The Wilayat also includes the desert, so that it is made up of pasture, sand dunes and wadis.

Most of the people are Bedouin, but nowadays they are nearly all settled in their areas. In addition, there is the urban environment where the inhabitants practice agriculture and trade.In the Wilayat Ja'lan Bani Bu 'Ali there are castles, forts, towers and old mosques. One of the most important castles is that of "Al Hamouda" which was built at the beginning of the 11th century A.H. There are also some ruined houses which have been taken over by the Organization of Castles and Forts.

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To the east is the Wilayat of Sur, to the west the Rimal Aal Wahiba and the Wilayat of Al Mudaibi, to the north the Wilayat of Al Kamil and Al Waafi and to the south the Wilayat of Ja'alan Bani Bu 'Ali. It also stretches south to the coast of the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean. There are about 160 villages .The Wilayat chose two crossed spears as its emblem which indicates the bravery and courage of its citizens.There is a collection of archaeological sites in the Wilayat. There are 15 castles, the most important being: the castle of Awlaad Murshid in the Al Manjarad area and the castle of Faleej. Al Mahiyul is considered the best fort in the Wilayat, which also has 13 other forts. This shows that, previously, it was a centre of local government. The most important of the 60 towers are: Al Safara, Al Mursid, and Burj Al Saqata. The Wilayat also has 40 ancient mosques.

Springs, falaj and caves make up the tourist attractions of this Wilayat. There are about 15 springs, the most important being : Jabal Qahwan, Al Khatam, Al Balida, Dima, Al 'Aqba and 'Ain

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This is an island located in the south east of the Sultanate, administratively it is part of the Sharqiya. Around it are a number of other islands the most important of which are Marsis, Sha'anzi and Kalbaan. In the Wilayat of Masira are a number of villages: Dafiyaan, Al Samar, Duwah Mashgaf, Marsis, Sur Masira, Haqal, 'Amaq, Maaghah, Raasa Sha'ah, Al 'Aija, and Wadi Al Maqar. Masira which is located in the Arabian Sea was a rest station for ships anchored off its shores, to get sweet water. Alexander the Great made it his base and called it Serepsis. Its beaches are a tourist attraction by themselves and in addition there are a number of springs on the island. 
The most important are: Al Qatara, Wadi Bilad and others near Jabal Al Hulm in the south of the Wilayat.The island has no falaj. A number of ancient forts are found on the island, the 2 most important being Marsis and Dafiyat.

Traditional occupations

Weaving is one of the most important traditional occupations. Masira was famous for building types of ships which are rarely found now. However the island is still famous for making fishing

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Sur town is one of the regional centers Located some 337 Kms from the Capital Muscat and the most important of Ash Sharqiyah cities. It played a historical rule in trade and navigation in the Indian Ocean. It was also known for ship buildding, as it was the most renowned city in the Arabian Peninsula in ship building in the last century. Besides, marine activity and ship building, Sur is femous for some historical touristic places such as caves. It is also known wood industries. textiles and produces a number of agricultural crops. Sur is located in the northern part of the Sharqiya coast in the Sultanate. It is constrained on the east side between the Arabian Sea on one side and the Gulf of Oman on the other. 
From the west it neighbors the Wilayat of Wadi Bani Khalid and from the north the Wilayat of Quriyat which is part of the Governorate of Muscat and in the south it neighbors the two Wilayats of Al Kamil and Al Waafi and Bani Bu Ali & Ja'alan Bani Bu Hassan. It stretches from Ras Al Had in the east to the mountains of Bani Jabir in the west

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Sur town is one of the regional centers Located some 337 Kms from the Capital Muscat and the most important of Ash Sharqiyah cities. It played a historical rule in trade and navigation in the Indian Ocean. It was also known for ship buildding, as it was the most renowned city in the Arabian Peninsula in ship building in the last century. Besides, marine activity and ship building, Sur is femous for some historical touristic places such as caves. It is also known wood industries. textiles and produces a number of agricultural crops. Sur is located in the northern part of the Sharqiya coast in the Sultanate. It is constrained on the east side between the Arabian Sea on one side and the Gulf of Oman on the other. 
From the west it neighbors the Wilayat of Wadi Bani Khalid and from the north the Wilayat of Quriyat which is part of the Governorate of Muscat and in the south it neighbors the two Wilayats of Al Kamil and Al Waafi and Bani Bu Ali & Ja'alan Bani Bu Hassan. It stretches from Ras Al Had in the east to the mountains of Bani Jabir in the west

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Located on the south coast of Al Wusta, in the north is the Wilayat of Duqm, in the south the Wilayat of Shalim, which is part of the Governorate of Dhofar, in the west the Wilayat of Haima and in the east the Arabian Sea.There are about 12 villages in the Wilayat with over 5832 inhabitants.The Wilayat of Jazur like the other coastal Wilayats of Al Wusta - Duqm and Mahut - has a number of beaches. The most important are in the reaion of Rima which is about 50 kms fromKhudra and Khudra Al Jazur where there are villages which benefit from free services.
The Wadis of 'Ail Al Khudra, Wadi Kaisar and Al Sabil, located on the beach have villages with "Samar" trees in the middle of them. Madhar and Fadhil beaches are the same. On the side of Rima there are two subsidiary areas which are part of the Wilayat of Jazur - Al Lakabi and Surara.

Traditional Occupations
The people of the Wilayat make farm tools and fishing nets, as it has a number of beaches on the the Arabian Sea. They also make boats from animal skins, and weave palm leaves.

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It is a vast Wilayat located in the heart of the desert in the middle of the Sultanate of Oman. Neighbouring it from the south is the Governorate of Dhofar, in the north the Dakhaliya, and especially the Wilayat of Adam, from the east the Arabian Sea and from the west the Desert of Rub' Al Khali.
It is almost mid-way between Muscat and Salalah, 540 km from Muscat and about 500 km from Salalah in the Governorate of Dhofar.

In the Wilayat of Haima there are some tourist features such as caves. The most outstanding is the cave of Al Raki which is located in the north east of Ja'aluni, water emerges from this cave but it is not potable. There is also Al Masak cave which hasearth's surface. It can be reached through an opening with a sloping path. The fourth cave is called Qataar and there is water in it but it is not drinkable. There are also, besides the caves, 3 springs. One of them is called "Buyi Al Huja" which is a vast rock standing on a rocky foundation forming natural shade.

 

The second is called "Al Asla" and

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It neighbours in the north the Wilayat of Mudaibi, which is part of the Sharqiya, in the north west the Wilayat of Adam, part of the Dakhaliya, in the south west the Wilayat of Duqm, and in the north east the Wilayat of Ja'alan Bani Bu 'Ali, part of the Sharqiya.There are about 32 villages with 9,761 people. It was one of the most important ports in previous times. It was famous for ship-building and for transporting travellers and goods from Oman to India, East Africa and other parts of the African continent, carrying Omani products and returning with goods which were not produced at that time in Oman.There are three islands in the Wilayat, the most important is the island of Mahut covered with "Qaram" trees, the island of Jaz with superb natural scenery and the island of Ab which has a great number of sea birds like the seagull and heron, besides other types of migratory birds. 
Beaches in the Wilayat of Mahut are, Kanasa, Las Ruis, Al Khulaf, Bantut, Ras Al Zakhar and Ras khaba Sarab.

Traditional Occupations
Most of the inhabitants of the Wilayat carry out shing and pasturage and animal husbandry besides

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 It is 80 Kms from Salalah and its main features are the old ruined site of Hanoun with its Pre-Islamic Arabic. Inscription, the Oasis of al shisr, its wadis which extend into  the heart of the desert wadi Andhour with its traces of early human settelment, and the wadi Dawkah reserve, which has been added to the UNESCO's World Heritage cultural list because of its importance as a site on the old frankincense trade route, najdi frankincense trees grow here in abundance.

 

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The road to the Wilayat of Dalkut passes over mountains and through wadis with green trees which are particularly lush and fragrant during the summer - or khareef'- season. Lying along the shores of the Arabian Sea, Dalkut is one of Oman's most beautiful wilayats - a stunning combination of mountains and beaches with a modern town and tranquil villages. Dalkut is 160 Kilometres west of Salalah. 
To reach it, you drive to al Mughsail, then up the steep winding Aqeeshan road to the Niyabat of Shahb As'eeb in the Wilayat of Rakhyut and from there to Wadi Seeq and Dalkut. The seas off Dalkut's rocky shore are full of fish and crustaceans.

The Niyabat of Khadhrafi is within Dalkut's boundaries, along with the settlements of Hafuf, Dahaq, Hakab, Himmut, Urf and Ghaduw and the mountainous districts and plateaux of Dara, Sheerashti, Ghoota, Sarfait and Dharbat Ali. Dalkut borders on the Wilayat of Rakhyut to the east and the Republic of Yemen to the west.


Its fine beaches have plenty of tourist potential and it has springs flowing into the wadis of Jabal al Qamar. Proof that the area was inhabited many centuries ago can

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The Wilayat of Mirbat is in the eastern part of the Governorate of Dhofar. It borders on the Wilayat of Sadah to the east, the Wilayat of Taqah to the west, Jabal Samhan to the north and the Arabian Sea to the south. It is 75 Kilometres from the city of Salalah. Its seas are teeming with fish and its coral reefs have made it one of the most popular destinations for divers in the country. In view of the importance of abalone as an economic resource, a study has been carried out on the possibility of setting up an abalone farming project in the wilayat with the aim of boosting the stocks of abalone in those areas which have suffered from over-fishing.
Mirbat has a population of 14,987 and is around 60 Kilometres from the city of Salalah. The Niyabat of Tawi Ateer comes under its jurisdiction. Some 25 Kilometres from the centre of the wilayat, it forms the western gateway to the Jabal Samhan reserve and has a gigantic cave with an area of over 300 million square metres called Taiq Cave, which is one of the biggest sink-holes in the world; its area is over

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As its climate is generally different from that of most of the Sultanate's other Governorates, date palms are a rare sight in the Governorate of Dhofar. An exception, however, is the Wilayat of Muqshin, which has many oases with date palms. Muqshin, in the north east of the Governorate of Dhofar on the eastern edge of the Empty Quarter desert, has a population of 529 and is 344 Kilometres from Salalah. It lies in the heart of the desert and consists largely of sand dunes. However, it also has extensive groundwater stocks because it is a meeting point for a number of wadis which flow down from the Dhofar mountain range and al Najd into the sands. It has been visited by numerous travellers and over the centuries many trading caravans have passed through it. Today it is a tourist destination, particularly for amateur explorers and desert sports enthusiasts.
 The Wilayat of Muqshin has four niyabats - Ramlat Muqshin, al Mushash, Mandar al Dhibyan and Marsawdad - as well as a number of desert villages. Ramlat Muqshin is an area of sand dunes 420 Kilometres from Salalah. Al Mushash, on the south-eastern fringes of the Empty Quarter, is

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In ancient times the Wilayat of Rakhyut was a centre of the frankincense trade with a busy harbour which used to export frankincense, livestock and animal products. Rakhyut is an attractive seaside town beneath the slopes of Jabal al Qamar near the heights of Ambaruf. It is 145 Kilometres west of Salalah and borders on the wilayats of Salalah to the east and Dalkut to the west. Historically, Rakhyut has been famous for frankincense, animal husbandry and fishing, while today its lovely beaches and lagoons ensure that it offers captivating views at any time of the year. Its niyabat of Shahb As'eeb is 15 Kilometres from the centre of the wilayat and becomes an expanse of emerald green during the khareef season.
Rakhyut's most popular tourist beaches lie beneath the mountain peaks and include Ras Sajer, Khorat, Keenzar, Shairooth, Daghar and Kanzur. Henna and tamarind trees grow in al Hawtah district, where there are numerous flowing springs.

At al Qazayeh the traces of an ancient human settlement can be seen including the remains of a stone wall. Extensive development has taken place in the wilayat under the Renaissance.

Traditional Occupations
Local crafts and traditional livelihoods include

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If they visit Sadah at the right time of year, visitors will have the chance to taste fresh abalone and lobsters straight out of the sea. This beautiful seaside wilayat with villages scattered along its shores is east of Mirbat and 135 Kilometres from the city of Salalah. It has numerous ancient buildings and its restored fort, which is at the eastern end of the chain of old fortifications along the Dhofari coast, is now a museum which contains various household utensils from earlier times. Some Kilometres from the centre of the wilayat are the ruined houses and towers of an old village known to the local people as al Mahallah. 
Hasik - a niyabat of the Wilayat of Sadah - is 70 Kilometres from the centre of the wilayat and 205 Kilometres from Salalah. Situated on a headland, its coast consists of steep limestone hills which have been eroded from below, while the seabed is sandy and sardines can be seen swimming in the shallow water. Hasik's chain of hills is broken by wadis and small creeks with sandy beaches.


The niyabat has an ancient ruined town and an old harbour that was used in

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Salalah  encapsulate's Dhofar glorious past and present day splendor. The ruins of the city of al Balid bear witness to Salalah's past prosperity, while every street and district of modern Salalah reflects the progress and achievements of Oman's Renaissance. The Wilayat of Salalah is on the Sultanate's southern coast 1,040 Kilometers from the Governorate of Muscat. It has several residential quarters including al Hisn, al Baz, Salalah al Jadidah, al Hafah, al Dahareez, al Sadah, al Awqadain, al Qardh and Raysut. The wilayat also has a number of niyabats and villages. The mountain Niyabat of Teetam is 30 Kilometers from the city.  Ghaduw and Qeiroon Hairiti - also 30 Kilometres from Salalah - are attractive picnic spots with shady trees. Zaik, around 38 Kilometres from Salalah, is on a plateau and becomes a mass of green trees and shrubs during the rainy season. Alsan is 36 Kilome¬tres away in the north-east of the wilayat.

There are also several niyabats that are not connected geographically with the Wilayat of Salalah but come under its administration, including
Harweeb (184 Kilometres from the Salalah), Tawsnat (240 Kilometres away).

The Baleed district is prominent among the archaeological sites testifying to

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The Wilayat of Shaleem and the Hallaniyat Islands is not a heavily populated area, and it is somewhat isolated and less developed than the other wilayats of the Governorate of Dhofar. Even so, the Renaissance has left its mark here and, despite the fact that this wilayat is still unspoilt, each of its three niyabats has an administrative centre which offers the local people a full range of services.The Wilayat of Shaleem and the Hallaniyat Islands lies up the coast around 300 Kilometres from the city of Salalah. It has three niyabats are al Shuwamiyah, Deemeet and the Hallaniyat Islands - a group of five small islands (al Halaniyah, al Qibliyah, Shaneef, al Sawdah - which are home to numerous species of sea birds and al Hasikiyah).  The population is concentrated on the island of al Halaniyah and services are provided for the local inhabitants by air or by sea; there is a small landing strip on the island as well as a harbour. 
There are three routes to the Wilayat of Shaleem and the Hallaniyat Islands. Visitors from Salalah can reach it via Thumrayt by turning right towards Marmul. It can also be reached from Haima

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The Wilayat of Taqah is always mentioned in connection with Khor Rori - the site of the historic city of Sumhuram which flourished in ancient times. Taqah lies on the Governorate of Dhofar's coastal strip between the wilayats of Salalah and Mirbat and is 30 Kilometres from the city of Salalah. It has two niyabats - Madinat al Haqq and Jibjat. Madinat al Hagq overlooks an area of fertile slopes and wadis with plenty of natural pastures which become lush grassy meadows with green trees during the khareef and attract large numbers of visitors. The districts of Khabrart and Shaiheet are nearby. The Niyabat of Jibjat also has green meadows, as well as a mild climate throughout the year. 
A pre-Islamic burial ground has been discovered on the eastern and western sides of Khor Sawli. The ruins of old Taqah - around one Kilometre to the west of the present town -are still standing.

 

Other local landmarks include Qasbar Fort on a hilltop north of Khor Taqah spring and the old cemetery, which covers an area of around 60,000 square metres.

There are hewn limestone columns in the Dhrirat district, which are considered to

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In ancient times the deserts of the Wilayat of Thumrayt played a role in the frankincense trade, which produced the civilization of al Shisr/Wubar with its columns and domes. Today it is an archaeological site. The Wilayat of Thumrayt is the gateway to the Governorate of Dhofar.It borders on the wilayats of Salalah to the south, Shaleem and the Hallaniyat Islands to the east and Muqshin to the north.To the west it borders on Wilayat of al Mazyounah. It is 80 Kilometres from Salalah. Its main features are the old ruined site of Hanoun with its pre-Islamic Arabic inscriptions, the oasis of al Shisr, its wadis which extend right into the heart of the desert, Wadi Andhour with its traces of early human settlement, and the Wadi Dawkah Reserve, which has been added to the UNESCO's World Heritage Cultural List because of its importance as a site on the old frankincense trade route; najdi frankincense trees grow here in abundance.
Thumrayt has five niyabats - Madhiy, al Shisr, Halouf wa Masheelah, Barbazoum and Dhahboun. Madhiy, 80 Kilometres from the centre of the wilayat on the edge of the northern Dhofar uplands, is a desert area with date palms

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The Tour begins in the morning by a visit to the Grand Mosque. Next we drive through the Embassy road to Muttrah Souq and fish market. From there, we drive past Corniche to the Old Town of Muscat. Then, we proceed to Al Alam Palace and the 16th century Forts, Al Mirani and Al Jalali Portuguese forts. The next stop is in Bait-Al Zubair Museum (Omani Heritage and Culture), Oman French Museum and Muscat Gate Museum. 

 

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National Day and birthday of Sultan Qaboos (November 18)
National Day is a big thing in Oman, a celebration of Sultan Qaboos's birthday and the country itself. The formal celebrations are moved to a different location around the country each year. There are usually camel races, traditional dancing, and lots of lights strung about. The evening is completed with a show of fireworks. Images of the Sultan and the Omani flag are erected all over the country.

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Dhow racing, horse racing, camel racing, bull fighting and falconry are Oman's prided and significant traditional sports. Each one represents a rich heritage and narrates eras from the history of Bedouin tribes and ancient Arabia. This seafaring nation has epochs of its coastline's antiquity buried under its deep waters since the era of the Persians, who controlled the coastal centers of Oman to the arrival of Islam in the 7th century, following which the peninsula witnessed the arrival of the Portuguese and the Ottomans.


Besides harboring history, this coastline was a vital medium for trading commodities between the

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White Oryx Tours & Travels, offers all types of sea tours in Muscat, Oman. We offers Dolphin watching trip, game fishing, snorkeling, costal cruise, dhow cruise, dhow dinner cruise, beach parties etc. Az'Zaha Tours operates from Marina Bander Al Rowdha. 
The total Omani fishing experience. No Boundaries Oman run custom made boats, fantastic lodges and a professional crew. The species list is endless with Popping, Jigging and light tackle fishing all producing excellent results in this isolated & unique fishery. No Boundaries was created especially for fishing and outdoor enthusiasts with a penchant for adventure and discovery of unspoiled wilderness. 

 

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These sports vary according to the nature of the terrain. Driving four-wheel vehicles is different in the desert from the mountain, and driving in the rugged valleys is different from driving in shallow waters. When travelling through Oman, you are bound to find in each valley and mountain a semi-paved road that cuts through the top of the mountain or the bottom of the valley.

Valleys differ in nature and some are easy to traverse, while others require superb driving and maneuvering skills. Perhaps Wadi AtTa'iyeen is the largest

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Looking for the perfect honeymoon? From intimate and romantic resorts to thrilling cities and adventure safaris, White Oryx has a honeymoon to suit you.
Many of our hotels offer complimentary honeymoon offers, including room upgrades, candlelit dinners and spa treatments, and our Personal Travel Experts can tailor-make your perfect honeymoon from scratch.

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Many people like to take a break away from the hustle and bustle of city life with its pampered lifestyle and go camping to break the routine of their lives. The diverse environment of Oman allows many options when it comes to camping. Camping is enjoyed on Shatti Qantab in Muscat Governorate, Shatti Ras Al Hadd in A'Sharqiyah South Governorate, on mountain tops in Jabal Shams (Sun Mountain) or Al Jabal Al Akhdar (Green Mountain) in A'Dakhiliyah Governorate, camping in the desert, both in Badiya sands in A'Sharqiyah North Governorate, or in The Empty Quarter in Dhofar.  This is

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Today White Oryx Tours & Travels is a well - known sea tours company in Muscat- Sultanate of Oman and provides its services to all major hotels in the city. Over the past years Oryx tours built a good relationship of trust and support with all its clients by providing the best services to all guests, and believes only the best will do for the people who choose the best tour company. White Oryx Tours also provide transportation for the clients from the hotel to marina bandar al rowdha and return back to hotel.
"Safety is a primary concern

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White Oryx Tours & Travels invites you to experience the wonders of the world. Whether it’s a fully escorted vacation, river cruise or an adventure trip, Oryx ensures high class and personalized service to our every client. The tours are designed keeping in mind your interest and budget. The facilities include the finest hotels, comfortable coaches, sumptuous meals, exclusive itineraries and most importantly a knowledgeable crew. We aim to make your trip a memorable one.

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A combination of 28 module variations, both stylistic and structural, to provide a unique and individual approach to specific modules.

WHITE ORYX TOURS & TRAVELS

 

The complete guide of Sultanate.

 

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