Discover the beauty of this misterious country, the Sultanate of Oman with White Oryx

Liwa

Liwa

When our thoughts turn to the Wilayat of Liwa, we think of the smallest and lightest of unsinkable ships, or the Baobab tree with its pain-killing powers, or the wilayat's tourist attractions like the mountain village of Qazah.With its 58 villages, Liwa is 270 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat, just beyond the Wilayat of Sohar and on the strip of coast that ends at the Wilayat of Shinas. It has numerous castles, forts and towers including Liwa Fort with its three towers, the recently-restored Qazah Fort - a fine three-storey citadel 15 metres high and 14 metres wide with four rooms on each floor - and Awlad Ya'rub Fort - an architectural gem in the village of Harmul. Liwa's white coral limestone mosques are an unusual feature of this area with their ventilation holes like small windows high up in their walls. Some of these mosques have attractive minarets; the prettiest is the minaret of al Bahlul mosque in Hillat al Husn.
The mosque of al Rabi' bin Habib in the village of Ghadhfan is named after one of the Hadith narrators of the early part of the 2nd century AH/8th century AD, who lived in this village before leaving it for Basra in search of knowledge. He then settled in Basra, though in the autumn of his life he returned to Ghadhfan, where he spent the rest of his days. Harmul Park, which the Municipality has laid out along the shore, is popular with visitors. Ain al Qurm, beside the lagoon at Harmul village, is another delightfully green and fertile spot and a resting place for migrating birds. In the mountain areas there are numerous beautiful villages with abundant water and temperate climates like Qazah, al Zuhaimi, Rahab, Bat and Dha'bain, which many people visit in the summer months. In al Zuhaimi you will find the Baobab tree - the only one in the north of Oman. People believe that this unique tree will kill pain if you insert a grain of sand in its massive trunk. Because of this, any local person with a toothache rushes immediately to this tree and inserts a grain of sand into it, after which the pain is either significantly reduced or disappears altogether. Attempts have been made to grow other Baobab trees from its cuttings, but they have not been successful.

Traditional Occupations
The most common occupations are fishing and agriculture, though a number of the local people are craftsmen. Some are silversmiths, while others - particularly the inhabitants of the mountain villages who keep goats- spin woollen thread or weave cloth.