Discover the beauty of this misterious country, the Sultanate of Oman with White Oryx

Al Khaboura

Al Khaboura

The Wilayat of al Khabourah is 178 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat and borders on the Wilayat of al Suwaiq to the east, the Wilayat of Sohar to the west, the Wilayat of Ibri to the south and the blue seas of the Gulf of Oman to the north. It has 76 villages.Al Khabourah has seven castles (the best-known of these is the castle of Bani Said), as well as twenty-one forts including al Khabourah Fort - a square building beside the sea with a round tower and a heavy wooden gate, which was restored in the year 2000. Date-palms, limes and fruit trees can be found in abundance in the wilayat's well-watered wadis and around the small villages that lie halfhidden among the mountains. Traces of the past may be seen in Wadi al Hawasinah and Wadi al Sarmi, famed for their fresh water springs and aflaj. Wadi al Hawasinah is one of al Khabourah's best-known and most fertile wadis and its mountain setting makes it a magnet for visitors. 
Among the most attractive of its thirty villages are Hijjah, al Rafi'ah, al Badi'ah (with its old dam, which is 200 metres long, four metres high and three metres wide), al Washihi, al Hamimi, al Rak and Saddain. The wadi's numerous springs include Ain Saddain, Ain al Ma'abela and Ain al Owainah, while its pools include Hawdh al Khajour, Hawdh Hammad, Hawdh al Buwaidhah and Hawdh al Hamimi.The wilayat's high mountains with their caves, cliffs and tree-studded slopes are home to wild animals such as the lynx, gazelles, foxes, wolves and desert hares. A 26-Kilometre drive from al Khabourah roundabout will take you to the turning to the villages of Wadi al Sarmi, which is also a popular spot with visitors in search of the beauties of nature. Strung out like beads on a necklace for a distance of 70 Kilometres along the streams and rock formations of the wadi lie al Dhwaihir, al Rakkah, al Sahirah and several other villages and hamlets. Wadi al Qunut and Wadi Halhal are also - enchanting wadis and well worth a visit.

   
Traditional Occupations
Local families can enjoy their leisure time with a trip to the public park or the beach, which has now been embellished with trees and picnic shelters. Other local crafts, apart from khanjar-making, include shasha-building, making fish-traps, halwa and textiles, palm-leaf work and leather work.