Discover the beauty of this misterious country, the Sultanate of Oman with White Oryx

Al 'Awabi

Al 'Awabi

The Wilayat of al 'Awabi is very similar to its neighbours, with its flowing wadis, mountain villages, fresh water springs and ancient buildings. Its best-known wadi is Wadi Bani Kharus, which extends as far as the beautiful village of al Aliya.
The Wilayat of al 'Awabi's emblem is a pen, an inkwell and a book. Over the years it has produced numerous scholars, poets and imams - the imams of Bani Kharus including al Warith bin Ka'b, al Salt bin Malik and Azzan bin Tamim, to name but a few - as well as men of letters like the poet Salim bin Ghassan al Lawah, and scholars like Abu Nabhan Ja'id bin Khamis al Kharusi who lived in the village of al Aliya where his mosque, his house and his tomb can be seen to this day.
Al 'Awabi has many old buildings and mosques including al Ghamamah Mosque in at Hajar village in Wadi Bani Kharus, forts like al Awabi Fort, al Rami Fort and al Salut Fort, and a number of towers.Al 'Awabi's most distinctive feature is the mountain range of the Western Hajar which overshadows it, forming a gigantic wall beneath which the wilayat sleeps safe and secure. The Wilayat of al Awabi is in the Batinah South Governorate. 
Bordering on the Wilayat of Rustaq to the north and west; the Wilayat of Nakhl to the east and the slopes of the Western Hajar mountains to the south, it is 156 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat and has a population of 10,469. It has eight schools with 6,096 male and female students and an eighteen-bed hospital in Wadi Bani Kharus, as well as a health centre in al Awabi itself. Some of its roads are surfaced; a 5.6 Kilometre stretch of road was paved recently.Wadi Bani Kharus, the best-known wadi in the Wilayat of al Awabi, begins at Stal - one of the biggest villages in the wilayat, with houses and farms spread out along the edge of the wadi, where there are many rock inscriptions recording events in its history. From here the traveller heads up into the wadi past the lime and date groves of al Hajar, al Misfah and other villages until he reaches the village of al Aliya on its upper slopes. Here he can admire the view of lime orchards, terraced plots and ancient houses clinging to the living rock. From a distance the village looks like a forest of date palms.
The villages in this wadi which are of most interest to tourists are al Ijjah, where passages and caves have been formed in the massive rocks and the rock inscriptions and drawings look like an open-air art gallery. Then there is al Sbaikha with its high mountains, lush green trees and glistening waters, and al Sanee' with its neat little houses surrounded by groves of sweet oranges, dates, limes and other fruits.  

Traditional Occupations
There are craftsmen in the wilayat who make gold and silver jewellery and hand-woven textiles.