Discover the beauty of this misterious country, the Sultanate of Oman with White Oryx

Nakhl

Nakhl

The Wilayat of Nakhl is famed for Ain al Thuwwarah - a fresh water spring that bubbles up through the rocks below the surface of the earth. There are numerous other springs nearby, all of which flow into one wadi. The wilayat gets its name - Nakhl - from the fact that the ground on which it stands "filters" the water. Ain al Thuwwarah, Nakhl's main attraction, receives visitors from far and wide at weekends and on holidays. They come to sit for hours, watching the water welling up from beneath the ground and flowing along the wadi and through the date palms.The Wilayat of Nakhl is 120 Kilometres from the Governorate of Muscat. To get there, you turn south at the Barka Roundabout towards the villages of Wadi'l Ma'awil and drive straight on until you see Nakhl's imposing old 200-foot-high fort in the distance in front of you. The fort, which is built on a rocky hill, is easily accessible since the asphalt road leads right up to its gate. There is a splendid view from its balconies, from where it is possible to see several of the wilayat's 74 villages scattered over the hills and plains, as well as the fertile wadis of Wadi'l Abyadh and Wadi Mistal, the high mountains including Jabal Nakhl and other features of this beautiful area.The borders on the Wilayat of Wadi'l Ma'awil to the north, al Awabi to the west and the slopes of al Jabal al Akhdhar to the south.
A visitor to Nakhl will be particularly interested in seeing the two landmarks that symbolise it - the fort and the spring. The fort is an example of human ingenuity and architectural brilliance, while the spring demonstrates the inimitable nature of the Divine creative genius.Ain al Thuwwarah is one of the most famous springs in the Sultanate and flows throughout the year. The municipality has made an attractive park there with picnic shelters, a car park and other facilities. At weekends and on holidays it is packed with visitors.Of course, the Wilayat of Nakhl also has plenty of other things to offer apart from the fort and the spring. There are wadis with lush greenery and water, like Wadi'l Abyadh, which is 25 Kilometres from the centre of the wilayat and is a popular spot for visitors. Fresh water springs are a common sight in the Wilayat of Nakhl; Wadi'l Abyadh has a hot spring called Ain al Sukhna near the village of al Sbaikha at the southern end of the wadi, which local people regard as an effective remedy for skin diseases. Its many aflaj include Falaj al Abtari, which flows throughout the year. The wadi, which can be reached by an asphalt road, enjoys a wide range of government services including electricity.Wadi Mistal is a fertile wadi renowned for its temperate climate, particularly in its high mountain villages like Wakan, which - at an altitude of 4,950 feet and on the northern slopes of al Jabal al Akhdhar overlooking the wilayats of Nakhl and Rustaq - is 33 Kilometres from the centre of the wilayat. The village produces excellent grapes, peaches and apricots and looks very similar to the other villages of the Jabal al Akhdhar. It is popular with visitors, who enjoy the local hospitality and are taken on tours of the area by the villagers.There can be few greater pleasures than sitting under a pomegranate tree heavy with ripe fruit and sipping a cup of coffee.On his way back to the centre of the wilayat the visitor can make a detour to the village of Hadash or call in at some of the other villages like al Hajar, al Qawrah, al Khadhra, al Aqibah or al Khadad, all of which are renowned for their agricultural produce, which includes grapes, sweet oranges, apricots, peaches and pomegranates.Wadi'l Mahalil is another area that is famous for its springs. The Wilayat of Nakhl also has numerous tourist oases like Buwah, al Taw, al Hasnat, Halban and other spots surrounded by mountains with lush date palms and flowing water.

 
Traditional Occupations
Some of the local people in the Wilayat of Nakhl make traditional handicrafts like khanjars, swords and Omani halwa, though the predominant occupation is farming.